Holiday Lifestye

Getting Good Sleep This Holiday Season

By Maria Blokhina

Who doesn’t like to sleep? Sleep is an integral part of our life that is linked to daytime functioning, health, and well-being. As we are entering a winter holiday season, we have a lot of time to rest and take good care of ourselves. According to a 2017 study by Dr. Tang from the Department of Psychology at the University of Warwick, a good night’s sleep can make us as happy as winning a lottery. In order to get as close as possible to the perfect night of sleep, we need to learn what affects our sleep and how to make it better.

Schedule

The National Sleep Foundation put a consistent schedule as a significant key to excellent sleep health. By going to sleep and waking up at the same time, you will set your internal body clock to rest and wake up faster and easier.

Take it easy

Extensive exercises stimulate your body and will not help you fall asleep, according to UF Health Sleep Center Sleep Hygiene Guidelines. Instead, try yoga or stretching, as it aims to  relax your muscles and body.

No caffeine or alcohol

As stated by the UF Health Sleep Hygiene Guidelines, it’s important to limit caffeine and alcohol consumption before bed as well. There is no specific amount or specific time; it all depends on your body. Both substances are stimulants that cause disrupted sleep.

Dim your gadget

Scrolling on your phone affects sleep. According to Harvard Medical School, the blue light from gadgets is bright enough to trick your mind into staying awake. If you have to use a device before bed, keep the screen brightness as low as possible. Utilize a Night Light setting that aims to reduce the amount of blue light emitted by the display. 

Prepare your bedroom

The right bedroom settings can help you fall asleep. Prepare your bedroom by keeping it a low temperature and lights dimmed. Don’t work in bed, as that gives your body and mind the wrong impression about your bedroom. 

Take the initiative

When you find yourself lying awake with no sign of sleep, get up, and doing something. Actions treat insomnia faster than forcing yourself to lay still in bed. If you have a lot of things going on in your mind and can’t fall asleep, get up and write them down in a journal.